Weekly Watchlist - Week 24 - ShAFF

While cinemas aren't able to fully reopen yet, the ShAFF team have been revisiting past festivals and choosing the best adventure films from around the world. We've created weekly watchlists of free online adventure films for your indoor entertainment and inspiration, and we’re posting a new film, free to view online, at 7pm every day. Watch them one by one, or save them up and screen your own virtual ShAFF session at home.

Keep in touch! If you enjoy the films, please post comments and reviews on our facebook page, and share the link with your friends.



A touching and rather cute documentary about the best climber in the world, and he certainly makes enough noise to the number one. The uninitiated will primarily be in awe at the terrible haircuts on show. The adventure sports prowess portrayed is of course highly impressive, even if the participants don't know how to use a mirror.

Paul Hodgson Music Judge

Gain fascinating behind-the-scenes access to the processes and mindset of a true climbing pioneer pushing climbing to the next level.

Ruth Farrar

If you’re going to the best in the world you’ve got to be a bit different from everyone else. Adam Ondra is both brilliant and unique, you’ll find yourself rooting for him despite or maybe because of his weird training techniques as he attempts some of the hardest sport climbs around the world. Another fantastic Reel Rock film, don’t miss it!

Anna Paxton

What to become the world's best climber? Here is the Step by step guide in how achieve it and make everyone in the room extremely awkward.

Ed Birch Director of Salt-Street productions

Every so often an athlete comes along who redefines their sport. Adam Ondra, the 25-year-old Czech crusher, is exploring a new realm of human potential in climbing. Late last year, he established a benchmark for the sport; a 5.15d in Norway he dubbed Silence (as in, drop the mic). On the heels of this ascent, we follow Adam from his home in the Czech Republic, across Europe to North America, as he innovates new training methods, establishes upper echelon first ascents, and attempts to be the first person to send 5.15 on the first try. Age of Ondra is a rare, intimate journey with one of the greatest athletes at the peak of his powers.

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Thoughtful and surprising, this is a different kind of adventure film. Siberia is a tough landscape to navigate, and the psychological and historical journey is equally difficult. Really recommended.

Anna Paxton

It's great to have a film that doesn't through all the answers at you. You descover the expedition and grow with the crew. Great story and storytelling.

Ed Birch Director of Salt-Street productions

In the autumn of 1942 the Lena river delta became a prison for almost three thousand innocent Lithuanian men and women, young and old, who were secretly deported here by the Stalin’s regime. These forced labour camps (Russian, Gulags) on the banks of Lena and the shore of the Laptev Sea, were supposed to supply Soviet army with fish during World War II, became graveyards for thousands. Those who died in this faraway land and those, who survived the ordeal, were later proudly called “the Laptevians”. Inspired by the legacy of Gulag survivors and led by the son of a Laptevian a group of four friends and experienced adventurers decided to embark on an unprecedented traverse, lasting more than 600 km laying the route that no one has ever done before. The aim of the trip was to cross the Verkhoyansky range using nothing but their feet, inflatable boats and a spirit of friendship, in order to endure a 30-day long unsupported expedition from Batagay Alyta to the Kyusyur – a village on the bank of Lena – a place where the father of one of the members of expedition was born, hoping to meet ancestors of Lithuanian gulag survivors, who might be living there until the present day. Finally, the group planned to reach the notorious Tit-Ary island in the Lena delta, visiting abandoned Gulag and cemetery, paying tribute to all that suffered there. Initially a 4 part web-documentary “Traces” is a part of a multimedia project, which encompasses the trials of this expedition and the past events that linger in the subconscious of the Lithuanian society. It invites the viewer to explore the map with the route of the expedition, see archival material which helps to understand the history of deportations, hear the stories of survivors and relive the experience of the expedition in a mini series of short video documentaries. As a multimedia project it was nominated for an award at European broadcasting festival PRIX EUROPA 2018.

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One of Reel Rocks total nail-on-the-head-hits

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.

So climbing is in the Olympics, Bouldering, Lead, and ...Speed... This entertaining film explores what it’s all about and how the pros are adapting to a discipline that a lot of climbers would rather forget.

Anna Paxton

When climbing was announced as part of the 2020 Olympics, it was a monumental occasion for the sport. But many climbers were shocked to learn that one of three combined events required to compete for a medal is… speed climbing. REEL ROCK correspondent Zachary Barr looks into this little-known and seldom practiced sub-discipline of the sport, and the role it will play in shaping climbing’s future. Barr’s journey from the U.S. to France (the birthplace of modern speed climbing) to South Asia (it’s actually huge there) culminates at an international competition in Moscow, where speed demons race up a 15-meter wall in less than six seconds.

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In 2017, Jay Gustafson launched Paddle for Progress, a two-year, 4,300-mile personal journey in response to Governor Dayton's call for water action. Jay's mission to reconnect humanity with one of our most precious resources took him to the most remote and least visited corners of Minnesota, as well as through nearly every major community in the state. ​ Alone in the wilderness, Jay reminds us how we are all linked to water, one of the most powerful elements on earth that is in a constant state of danger. His passion for paddling and call to something greater than himself leads us down water trails into our own spirit's journey and connection with the earth. ​ Waterway Jay is the story of this one man's journey to save water, and how we are connected to it all.



Super inspiring film, a window into a different set of lives.

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.

Women are Mountains is a short documentary film that portrays the lives of climbers Mônica Filipini and Danielle Pinto in the quiet city of São Bento do Sapucai, in the countryside of São Paulo, Brazil. At the same time as they are responsible for their children and domestic affairs, they are able to enjoy their great passion: the mountains. With lyricism, this documentary showcases Brazilian feminine multi-pitch climbing scenery (a traditionally masculine sport in Brazil) and investigates the motivations of the two climbers practicing the sport.

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