Online - Spirit Of ShAFF



What is Tarzan actually had the place his gear?

Ed Birch Director of Salt-Street productions

Shot like a David Attenborough documentary, what a beautiful place to climb.

Anna Paxton

National Geographic Explorer Mike Libecki continues his addiction to unexplored Earth in hopes of standing on a first ascent, but as the saying goes, "When life looks like easy street, there is danger at your door." Sometimes one of the most difficult things on an expedition is to try and define the line between dangerous and too dangerous...sometimes coming home alive is success.

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An authentic perspective on Free Soloing, as Toru Nakajima, (infamous to Grtistoners as the first ascensionoist of BlackOut, E96C) of tackles (what I'm sure in this country is known as 'what-we-make-kids-do-on-outwardbound-weekends-in-December) but in Japan is sawanobori’ – the ancient art of climbing waterfalls.

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.

Free soloing a waterfall in Japan, epic! An innovative and inspiring climbing film.

Jimmy Hyland

When climbing why not leave the ropes behind and take a waterproof instead? 😮

Ed Birch Director of Salt-Street productions

Spectacular free solo attempt on a waterfall... wait for the 'splash crux' !

Anna Paxton

Tateyama, Toyama Prefecture. After you pass Ashikura Temple, which is an entrance to Tateyama mountain range, you will see a wide valley surrounded by a 500m cliff. This "groove" cut into the plateau of pyroclastic flow deposits from Tateyama volcano is a trace of an ancient giant fall that Shomyo river had gradually wore over 220,000 years. At the back of the groove about 7km upstream, there is a site in which Shomyo river has been digging the groove. That is a Shomyo Falls that known as the largest drop in Japan. The rain and melted snow on Tateyama range gather and run into this valley cuts into the plateau, and then flow down a 350 m gap to the bottom of the groove. The amount of water is enormous throughout the year. The roar from 3 tons of water flow every second make its imposing appearance and impress you as the greatest waterfall in Japan. Toru Nakajima, although his age is 26, he has the ability to compete with top climbers in the world. Not only he has climbed some V15 and 5.14 but also experienced some bold climbing such as free solo in UK. One day he came up with the challenge; “Free soloing on Shomyo Falls”. Freesolo is a solo climbing without a rope. It is the most primitive and “free” method of rock climbing. Climbers climb cliffs with no safety equipment, literally by themselves. The only difference between free soloing and usual free climbing is whether they use such equipments or not. However, the difference is crucial for their lives. Falling in free soloing means a death. Free soloing is a completely crazy style. Whoever he told “I would like to free solo Shomyo falls,” they seemed to be saying "Are you serious?" No one showed praise like “it is gonna be great.” Free soloing this waterfall is very different from that on a dry cliff. On a dry, hard rock, you will never fail unless you will choose a route too hard for your level, get terribly or lose your focus during the route. However, free soloing on this Shomyo Falls has various other factors which you cannot control with your climbing skills. Rock is soaked, so slippery, and fragile, and there are rock falls frequently. The river rises so quickly when it rains. It was not easy for you, who have climbed only dry rocks, to avoid these risks. However, you have to climb carefully, finding out loose rocks and better spot to grab on, step by step, and finish it before the weather would get worse to avoid falling to die. He is not an adventurer but an ordinal young guy who study in a laboratory every day and look forward to going to mountains on weekends or hanging out with friends. He wouldn’t fall and die for anything. So He was really worried until the day before the attempt. Fear eroded his mind when he put down his guard and forced him to imagine the worst ending. “Am I eager to free solo that waterfall? Do I need such a hardship in my life?” He had been asking himself every day, but he had not got an answer. How he overcome these risks and fears? The film shows you an awesome challenge in a magnificent nature by a climber.

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An inspiring portrait of a challenge with a greater than you might think.

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.



What could you do for your fiftieth birthday? A man's meditation on ritual in the mountains.

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.

"I thought I saw people in the Kate afternoon. Unfortunately they were rocks." Gorgeous meditation on self-powered solo exploration in stunning landscapes. Lovely.

Paul Hodgson Music Judge

A peaceful and meditative account of a solo journey. How did he carry all that kit for hiking/camping/kayak/climb?!

Anna Paxton

Every year we get a little older. One day you turn 50. How you choose to celebrate is up to you. Alpinist and mountain guide Robert Jasper is heading out to Greenland for a solo expedition. He leaves the small village of Kulusuk with his sea kayak. After twelve days of paddling and carrying heavy loads Robert reaches his basecamp at the foot of Molar Spire. Calmly, concentrated and all by himself he begins the ascent of this 500m rock face.

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This had me in bits.... what a pair.

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.

Terrifying story about rowing across the North Atlantic. Absolutely madness.

Paul Hodgson Music Judge

Two best friends undertake a unsupported row from NYC, USA to Salcome in the UK to raise money for the Brain Tumor Charity. Tom lost his father suddenly a year before the row to a tumor. It was far from easy, and with a few hurricanes, capsizes, food rationing and lots of pain killers its a trip they won't be forgetting in a hurry.

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The Line Between Good and Evil traces the route of The North Face team captain, Hilaree Nelson, on her two decade vision to summit and ski 21,252' Papsura. The peak, one of a pair of Indian Himalayan Peaks are referred to as "The Peaks of Good and Evil". As viewers journey with Hilaree from her first Indian Himalayan expedition in 1999 until 2017, the commitment to the line she would ski and the line she would have to walk for half her life to attempt it are exposed. This film is a harrowing account of the deepest commitment to the grips of dreams.



Fantastic kayak movie with beautiful visuals, lovely electronic music and a dry, amusing, heartfelt voice over. Definitely transcends its genre so go see even if you're not into kayaking.

Paul Hodgson Music Judge

Six kayakers. 400 kilometers. A 17-day self-supported trip down the Apurimac River. In 1975, Calvin Giddings led a group of paddlers down the first descent of Peru's Abismo de Apurimac. Thanks to their commitment to complete the first descent of the Apurimac’s main whitewater section, the We Are Hungry (WAH) crew can confidently enter this box canyon. Always on the hunt for stout whitewater in remote reaches of the world, this group of French kayakers is known for asking Why. Why are we out here? What are we doing here? Considered the farthest source of the Amazon, the Apurimac River flows from the Andes, through deep boxed canyons, to the calm waters of the Peruvian jungle. Guided by their passion for the river and their desire for adventure, this trip questions the possibility of living with little, together, in an environment remained untouched by man, a place where only kayakers can go.

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Having been friends since primary school, Téo, Norman and Julien went their separate ways following university; Téo found work in the Netherlands, Norman in France and Julien in Canada. However in 2015 they reunited to spend the Christmas holidays together at Téo's house in the Netherlands. This reunion became the catalyst for the adventure of a lifetime when all 3 committed to leaving their jobs, buying a boat and sailing around the world together as The Apprentis Nomades!
Fast forward 3 years and a battered and bruised La Julianne carrying the three exhausted adventurers limps into safe harbour in Adelaide, South Australia. They had survived the 'roaring forties' and touched on the 'furious fifties' and are lucky to be alive. Emotionally and physically exhausted, with no money left, they decide to remain in Adelaide to recover and rebuild. It's during this period that Julien has a chance meeting with Melisa, who is completing a Post Graduate Certificate in Producing at the University of South Australia and as part of her course must produce a short documentary.
Melisa (Producer): "they had so many interesting stories and lots of incredible footage of amazing places from all over the world, but I had to focus on the section of their trip that I found the most interesting; the time they spent in the sub-Antarctic Indian Ocean when they sailed to the Kerguelen Islands, one of the most isolated islands on the planet. What they went through both before and after Kerguelen tested them to their absolute limit, but what I found most intriguing about these three remarkable young men is their personal journey. So rather than simply focusing on the story of their trip, I wanted to show you who they are, to reveal their incredible heart and spirit and how the time they spent in the Indian Ocean has impacted them both individually and as a team. They really are three of the most incredible and inspiring young men that I’ve ever had the pleasure of meeting and I’m in awe of them as human beings.”



Historically illustrative running... Go try it!

Claire Carter Writer, Film Officer for Kendal Mountain Festival, 'Creative Consultant'.

As if you need inspiration to explore in your backyard. But here you go!!!!

Ed Birch Director of Salt-Street productions

Enjoyable Aussie running film with fascinating archive footage and lovely drone shots of lush modern landscape. Very nicely done

Paul Hodgson Music Judge

Uncovering the secrets of the past in his own backyard, runner Bo traces the tracks of an old railway line, bushwhacking, fence-hopping, and hoping the neighbours won't shoot...

Anna Paxton

Beau Miles lives next to the old Warragul-Noojee Railway line, which snaked for 43km through the foothills of Mt. Baw Baw, and ran from 1892-1954. You can still see the line now as strange scars across paddocks and bold cuttings through the sides of hills. Overgrown, private, exposed, or hard to find, Beau aims to re-run the train line, picking up and finding the stations of yesteryear.

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